2017 Porsche 718 Cayman

Porsche Cayman S 2017 Blue 718

Not trying to turn this into a Porsche site (and I will eventually get to the point of being able to post more regularly), but after the release of the turbo engined 911’s and Boxster’s a while back, Porsche continues the relentless push into the future with turbo’d Cayman’s now as well. Totally expected (given the afore mentioned announcements), but I personally was eagerly awaiting this one for a couple of reasons – I think the light hardtop will benefit hugely in street driving from the extra torque the turbo engines kick out, and for the first time ever, Porsche has decided (like pretty much every other car on the planet), the hardtop (Cayman) should be cheaper than the convertible (Boxster).

Porsche Cayman Grey 2017

This latest iteration builds on the previous appearance update – I was never a huge fan of the looks of the original Cayman, but this (and the previous) iteration look fantastic to my eyes. I’d go as far to say I prefer the looks of these to the new 911’s, and I’m not quite sure (if I had $100k to spend on a new car) if I’d get a tricked out Cayman S or a base 911. Luckily for me I don’t have this dilemma in real life, so until I win the lottery I can hold off on deciding and admire both from afar. OK, ramble over – full press release details after the jump…..

[Read more…]

Porsche R

Porsche 911 R Outside

Trying to get a little caught up on my posts after a pretty slack start to the year, so here’s my favorite announcement of the year – a proper 911 with a proper gearbox. The only bad news is that (based on some reports from sources who’ve tried) you’re not allowed on the waitlist for one of these unless you’re already in possession of a nice little 918 Spyder, meaning you are either a) very lucky, or b) have little to no chance of buying this beauty. Full press release and pics below for your perusal.

411389_P16_0174_a4_rgb

Celebrating its world debut at the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show, the new 2016 Porsche 911 R follows the tradition set by the first road-homologated race car bearing the name in 1967. Produced as part of a limited production series, the original 911 R (R for Racing) was entered in rallies, in the Targa Florio and in world record runs. Like its legendary predecessor, the new 911 R features a systematic lightweight construction, a high level of performance and an unfiltered driving experience. The 911 R is limited to 991 units worldwide, and represents the lightest available version of the 911 with a curb weight of just 3021 pounds. Powered by a 500 hp four-liter naturally aspirated flat-six engine which is mated to a six-speed manual transmission, the 911 R underscores Porsche’s commitment to building emotional and engaging high-performance sports cars with a maximum amount of driving pleasure. Developed by Porsche’s motorsport department, the 911 R is the third model to use Porsche’s latest generation of high-performance naturally aspirated flat-six engines alongside the track-bred 911 GT3 and 911 GT3 RS models.

Powering the 911 R is the four-liter flat-six familiar from the 911 GT3 RS. The race-bred powertrain delivers 500 hp at 8,250 rpm and generates 338 lb.-ft. of torque at 6,250 rpm. The 911 R can accelerate from 0 to 60 miles per hour in 3.7 seconds and reach a top track speed of 200 miles per hour. True to its purist character, the lightweight model is available exclusively with a six-speed manual transmission featuring short, performance oriented gear ratios. The quick and crisp shifting further underscores the high level of driving engagement.

A thoroughbred driving machine utilizing track-bred technology

Porsche 911 R Interior

The 911 R was designed with corners in mind. The specially tuned standard rear-axle steering offers direct turn-in response and precise handling while maintaining a high level of stability. The mechanical rear differential lock ensures a maximum amount of traction, while the standard Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system with 16.1 inch front and 15.4 inch rear rotors offers ultimate braking performance. Ultra-High Performance Tires measuring 245 millimeters at the front and 305 millimeters at the rear generate significant levels of grip. They are mounted on forged, lightweight 20-inch wheels with a matte aluminum finish and center locking hubs.

Porsche Stability Management (PSM) has been specifically calibrated for the 911 R by Porsche’s motorsport department. A rev-match function, which can be activated at the touch of a button, is a standard feature, while a single-mass flywheel is available as an option, sharpening the responsiveness of the engine even further. A front-axle lift system can also be optionally equipped to maximize everyday practicality: it can increase the ground clearance of the front axle by approximately 1.2 inches at the touch of a button.

Weighing just 3021 pounds, the 911 R is 110 pounds lighter than the 911 GT3 RS. The front luggage compartment lid and the front fenders are made of carbon fiber, while the roof is made of magnesium, lowering the vehicle’s center of gravity. Reduced interior insulation and the omission of rear seats also help to reduce weight. The 911 R comes standard without an air conditioning or audio system. They can be ordered at no extra charge.

More than meets the eye: classic 911 look with GT racing technology

Porsche 911 R Steering View

The 911 R retains a sleek, classic look. At first glance, the body resembles that of the 911 Carrera. Only the front fascia and rear body familiar from the 911 GT3 hint at the birthplace of the 911 R: Porsche’s motorsport department in Flacht. Under the skin, the 911 R has much to show: the engine comes from the 911 GT3 RS. All the lightweight components of the body and the complete chassis have been adopted from the 911 GT3. Road use being the priority, the 911 R does without the fixed rear wing characteristic of the 911 GT3 and 911 GT3 RS models. Instead, an automatically deployed rear spoiler, familiar from the 911 Carrera models, and a rear underbody diffuser specific to the 911 R provide the necessary downforce. Front and rear fascia components are taken from the 911 GT3. The Sport Exhaust System is made of lightweight titanium, as is the case for the 911 GT3 RS. A redesigned spoiler lip is installed at the front. Optional Porsche logos on the side of the vehicle and color stripes in red or green running over the center of the car display the connection to its legendary predecessor.

The 911 R is equipped with full bucket seats with carbon fiber backrests and seat centers upholstered in houndstooth design, paying homage to the original 911 of the 1960s. A “911 R-specific” GT Sport steering wheel measuring 14.1 inches in diameter awaits the driver’s commands. Gearshifts can be carried out via a shortened, R-specific gear lever. Carbon fiber interior trim strips with an embedded aluminum badge on the passenger side indicate the limited production number of the 911 R. A feature typical of GT vehicles, the conventional handles are replaced with door opening loops.

Vehicle launch and prices

Porsche 911 R

The 2016 Porsche 911 R can be ordered now. In the United States, it will be reach dealers late this summer. The starting MSRP is $184,900, excluding the $1,050 destination charge.

LaFerrari vs P1 vs 918

Clear your schedules. If you have even the slightest like of cars, you need to watch this. You can thank me later.

Old Porsche’s Make Me Smile

Gotta love ’em, especially with a little souping up

1986 Porsche 944 Turbo | Bring a Trailer

I probably shouldn’t post this as I’m about to go home and count the pennies behind the couch cushion, but if you’ve never taken a look at Bring a Trailer, it’s a great site for the classic and not so new cars out there. And today up pops a pretty perfect (and very stock) dream car from my youth (along with the Testarossa I posted about earlier – I had lots of space on my bedroom wall for posters….)

This 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo is a very clean and well documented example that is unmodified from stock. Zermatt Silver over black leather is great combo and the car has benefited from extensive maintenance throughout the years and comes with a thick folder of service records.

Source: 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo | Bring a Trailer

Breaking News – Germans on schedule!!!!!

2015 Porsche 918 Spyder _5_

Of course, that’s not really breaking news, but the main point of this post is to document the sad day that is the end of production for the Porsche 918 Spyder. Although some people didn’t think they’d sell them all (see pic below) they did manage it pretty easily, and if you left it too late, you’re out of luck now (which pretty much guarantees the second hand market for these in the current environment will be pretty warm to say the least).

harris_apology_tshirt

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 RS Video Review

Everyone loves a winner, and this my friends, is a winner (along with the first time I’ve ever lusted after a purple car….)

 

And as an aside, Chris (and Neil the cameraman) are trying to keep making these videos (and making them free), so would appreciate any support you can provide at this link. It really is the right thing to do if you like the stuff he puts out (and I like it a lot).

Mercedes AMG GT vs Porsche 911 Turbo

The matchup everyones been waiting for (and by everyone, I mean me and probably a couple of hundred 14 year old boys). Enjoy!

Porsche Cayman GT4 Review – Chris Harris

Someone got to spend a little time this weekend playing with the new Cayman GT4 in Portugal. Without any major spoilers, it’s pretty fantastic – the video is definitely worth your time.

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

313653_P15_0152_a5_rgbFollowing on from the recent release of information for the Cayman GT4 comes the next race-car for the street from Porsche – the 911 GT3 RS.

The new Porsche 911 GT3 RS breaks down the barrier between road-going sports cars and race cars. It is equipped with the maximum amount of motorsport technology that is currently possible in a street-legal 911 suitable for everyday driving. Extensive modifications to its drivetrain, aerodynamics, and lightweight design take performance to an even higher level than the 911 GT3. With a Nuerburgring Nordschleife lap time of seven minutes and 20 seconds, the new 911 GT3 RS surpasses the 911 GT3 by five seconds, making it the fastest current generation 911 on the famous German racetrack.

Porsche 991 GT3 RS

The 911 GT3 RS is powered by a four-liter six-cylinder engine developing 500 hp and 338 lb.-ft. of torque, combined with a specially developed PDK transmission. The engine has the largest displacement and most power of any naturally aspirated engine with direct fuel injection in the 911 family, accelerating the high-performance sports car from zero to 60 miles per hour in 3.1 seconds and propelling it through the quarter mile on the track in 11.2 seconds. Functions such as declutching by “paddle neutral” – which is comparable to pressing the clutch with a conventional manual gearbox – and speed limiting via the Pit Speed button have been adapted from motorsport use. They give drivers more freedom in terms of driving dynamics, while providing them with a maximum level of control and engagement.

Porsche 991 911 GT3 RS Rear

For the first time, the roof is made of magnesium; carbon fiber is used for the engine and luggage compartment lids, and other components are made of weight saving materials. This makes the RS model around 22 pounds (10 kilograms) lighter than the 911 GT3. Furthermore, the lightweight roof lowers the sports car’s center of gravity which improves its already excellent lateral dynamics.

Porsche 991 GT3 RS Interior

The interior design of the 911 GT3 RS with Alcantara® elements is based on the current 911 GT3. One key new feature is the full bucket seats, which are based on the carbon bucket seats from the 918 Spyder. The optional Sport Chrono Package features – in addition to its integrated timers – the Porsche Track Precision app for smartphone use. The Track Precision app can be used to have times automatically measured via GPS, and to log data on a smartphone for many driving parameters such as vehicle speed, lateral acceleration as well as deceleration and acceleration in the driving direction. It manages this data and lets the driver share and compare it with results from other drivers.

313671_P15_0151_a4_rgb

The 911 GT3 RS can be ordered now, and it will launch in the U.S. in early July of 2015. In the United States, the MSRP is $175,900.